TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

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TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

Postby sledge » Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:51 am

I can see this workin and basically u can do this now with the right equipment. :thumbleft:

A loungeroom revolution is brewing in Australia as an onslaught of technology providers vie for a slice of the home entertainment market once dominated by television networks.

The battle for our eyes is being fought on several fronts, according to a study commissioned by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, which revealed that one in five Australians had already viewed full-length television programs over the internet with one in eight full-length films online.

ISPs are working alongside various hardware and software partners to tie together packages that make it increasingly attractive to download movies, games and even favourite television shows via the internet.

Traditional TV networks have also been promoting 'catch-up' TV content which can be accessed online for those who missed the scheduled screening.

"With higher internet speeds and increasing bandwidth capacity, increasingly consumers are less restricted to viewing their favourite programs according to a predetermined schedule or on a single device, such as the family television," says ACMA Chairman, Chris Chapman. "Already, we've seen television 'catch-up' services gathering popularity in Australian households."

So where will that leave the giant flatscreen TV you so recently had mounted on the wall?

Given that many of the new breed of internet TV services incorporate set-top boxes, much of this new content will be routed seamlessly from your computer to your TV screen.

TV manufacturers such as Sony and Samsung are determined not to be left out of this converging landscape and have already begun showing off spanking new models loaded with useful web features and widgets for checking the weather, downloading movies or YouTube clips and even updating Twitter.

Even the internet search giant Google has jumped into the fray with some ambitious internet TV plans of its own, bringing the power of search to all the entertainment content available on the internet.

According to ACMA, traditional content viewing services such as free-to-air and subscription broadcasting are still "the overwhelming backbone for video and television viewing in Australia" but it warns that the barrage of new content channels will increase the fragmentation of audiences, with "unknown ramifications on content owners, distributors, broadcasters and regulators".

While it is unlikely there will be room for everyone to play in the lounge room of the future, there is no shortage of contenders prepared to try their hand. Here is round up of the key players in Australia.

Read the full article here
http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/home ... -zpnm.html

I already have my external 'Computer' HDD with my downloaded movies/music/Tv series hooked up to my TV via Media Player adaptor which cost me about $45. Quite Neat

The Best Players from the article in my opinion is either fetch TV or Google TV
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Computers lead in online TV viewer chase: survey

Postby sledge » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:18 pm

another interesting article i see Internet TV on ur big screen TV taking over. Yes Sir! :salute:
A new survey debunks claims that televisions will win the battle with computers for viewers of online TV.

Set manufacturers and TV networks insist the main TV screen will ultimately defeat the computer as the principal method of watching full-length TV programs downloaded from the internet.

But Fairfax Media's digital arm says a quarter of the 10,157 people who responded to a survey about online viewing said they watched full-length TV programs or movies online, and that 95 per cent of that viewing was done on laptops or personal computers, not on TV.

Sixty-four per cent said they were watching programs on computer screens at night.

"To me that shows people are continuing to watch on their computers and at the very least the PC is the second screen at home," the head of video at Fairfax, Ricky Sutton, said.

The survey results came as Fairfax, publisher of the Herald, announced a tie-up with the ABC to show many of the corporation's most popular shows on websites such as smh.com.au and theage.com.au. The back catalogue of The Gruen Transfer, Foreign Correspondent and Enough Rope, to name a few, will be available on its sites next month as part of Fairfax's ambition to become a major online-TV player.

In an average month, Fairfax serves 9.5 million videos, mostly short news clips of up to three minutes. The ABC deal marks its entry into ''longer-form'' video content and will, it hopes, deliver a windfall in revenue from ads shown on online video.

Frost & Sullivan market research analysts estimate the online video ad market will grow 56 per cent to $57 million by June 30, 2011, and by 48 per cent a year until 2014.

But manufacturers are not convinced. Two months ago Sony launched a range of TVs that allow people to view catch-up TV shows from SBS and Channel Seven streamed from the web. Samsung and LG are not far behind.

Sony's technology communications manager, Paul Colley, said the computer was likely to be used only for ''snacking'' TV snippets and that the viewing of longer programs would move to TV screens. ''Crowding around a PC with a mouse in hand is not particularly conducive to watching those [longer] programs. People are also more likely to be watching on their own because of that,'' he said.

''Internet TV will become a normal viewing habit and for a good viewing experience we believe that can only really be on the TV.''

Mr Sutton cited survey results that showed between 10 and 17 per cent of respondents wanted more news, entertainment, documentaries and TV shows from internet TV services.

A third of respondents said they were prepared to pay for content without ads. That, coupled with the success of movie and TV show sales through Apple's iTunes, had convinced him there was a willingness to pay for some content.


http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/digi ... -zcjl.html
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Re: TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

Postby Barmaley » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:21 pm

Is it legal to copy and paste copyrighted materials on forums? I saw many forums doing it, but i am surprised!
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Re: TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

Postby spot » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:33 pm

Barmaley wrote:Is it legal to copy and paste copyrighted materials on forums? I saw many forums doing it, but i am surprised!
Many forum administrators will have received Cease And Desist requests from legal agents acting for a copyright holder. The Internet is awash with such copying so for the most part it goes unremarked, but that doesn't necessarily make it legal. Fair Use legislation tends to be interpreted, in Europe at least, as partially quoting from the source and linking back to the original text if it's online. In practice, if an administrator allows full-text pasting then it happens but it's ultimately at his own risk (at least if the site has any moderation at all - there may be an escape for unmoderated sites which can claim to be merely resources for their users, though I'd doubt it would work).
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Re: TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

Postby sledge » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:50 pm

Barmaley wrote:Is it legal to copy and paste copyrighted materials on forums? I saw many forums doing it, but i am surprised!


What? u want me to post some Bit Torrent links to movies etc? :scratch: which i don't think Brian may appreciate me doing.
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Re: TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

Postby Barmaley » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:53 pm

sledge wrote:
Barmaley wrote:Is it legal to copy and paste copyrighted materials on forums? I saw many forums doing it, but i am surprised!


What? u want me to post some Bit Torrent links to movies etc? :scratch: which i don't think Brian may appreciate me doing.

LOL - I was talking about the article which was copied at the beginning of the thread...
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Re: TV revolution: welcome to loungeroom 2.0

Postby Brian » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:10 pm

Barmaley wrote:Is it legal to copy and paste copyrighted materials on forums? I saw many forums doing it, but i am surprised!


It's not legal, and it's certainly not permitted here. I wouldn't look good in an orange jumpsuit. :lol:
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Makes you talk a little lower
About the things you could not show her."

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