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Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 3:12 pm
by MADNOTBAD
This Is fantastic news eh?

Roman gladiator cemetery found in England

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 3:30 pm
by silverpop
London, England (CNN) -- Heads hacked off, a bite from a lion, tiger or bear, massive muscles on massive men -- all clues that an ancient cemetery uncovered in northern England is the final resting place of gladiators, scientists have announced after seven years of investigations.

The archeological dig has found "what may be the world's only well-preserved Roman gladiator cemetery," the York Archaeological Trust said.

more on this topic here:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/europe/06 ... index.html

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:02 pm
by Linnea
Well, that's how ignorant I am, I didn't even know they had gladiators in Britain. :oops:

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 5:50 pm
by silverpop
:roll:

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 5:53 pm
by Linnea
:x

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:10 pm
by MADNOTBAD
Linnea wrote:Well, that's how ignorant I am, I didn't even know they had gladiators in Britain. :oops:

Ignorant not at all.

Parts taken from Wikki

Roman Britain was the part of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between AD 43 and about 410.

The Romans referred to their territory as Britannia, and it eventually consisted of all of the island south of the shifting frontier with Caledonia. Prior to the Roman invasion, Iron Age Britain already had cultural and economic links with Continental Europe, but the invaders introduced new developments in agriculture, urbanization, industry and architecture, leaving a legacy that is still apparent today. Historical records beyond the initial invasion are sparse, although many Roman historians mention Britannia in passing, and the names of many of its governors are known. Most knowledge of Roman Britain stems from archaeological investigations and especially epigraphic evidence.

The first Romans to campaign extensively in Britain were the forces of Julius Caesar in 55 and 54 BC, but the first significant conquest did not begin until AD 43, under Claudius. The Romans established a provincial government and steadily extended their control north, but were never able to exert firm control over Caledonia. Following the conquest of the native Britons, a distinctive Romano-British culture emerged. The Romans cemented the province's northern border with Hadrian's Wall, completed around 128. In 142, they pushed the frontier north to the Forth-Clyde line, constructing the Antonine Wall, but they retreated back to Hadrian's Wall after only twenty years. Around 197, Britannia was divided into two provinces, Britannia Superior and Britannia Inferior; in 293, it was subdivided even further and made into an imperial diocese. For much of the later period, Britannia was subject to barbarian invasion and often came under the control of imperial usurpers and pretenders. The Romans largely departed from Britain around 410, leading to what is known as the sub-Roman period, but the legacy of the empire was felt for hundreds of years.


Approx 20 minutes drive from my home Is the famous Roman Spa Baths built by The Romans
http://visitbath.co.uk/site/things-to-d ... ths-p25681

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:22 pm
by Linnea
I just didn't picture them having that much time for frivolities, being busy fighting off those woady Scotsmen.

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:45 pm
by Linnea
WOAD, once used as war paint by ancient Britons to strike fear into the hearts of their enemies, could now be used in the battle against cancer.
Scientists have discovered that the plant Isatis tinctoria, is a rich source of an anti-tumour compound glucobrassicin (GBS), which is also found in broccoli and Brussels sprouts, and is believed to be especially active against breast cancer.

A recent paper from Dr Stefania Galletti's research team at the University of Bologna, Italy, found that woad contains 20 times more of the cancer- fighting compound glucobrassicin (GBS) than broccoli. Like its relatives, the woad plant uses the compound as a defence mechanism to ward off insect pests, releasing extra levels of GBS when damaged by chemicals or after physical injury.

Researchers have boosted the plant's output dramatically by puncturing its leaves to mimic wounds left by insects and hope the quantities obtained will be high enough to use in clinical trials.

A recent study found a significant correlation between increased brassica consumption and reduced levels of lung cancer chemicals in smokers.

Other research indicates GBS may act against breast cancer by flushing out derivatives of the hormone oestrogen. However, levels of the compound are quite low in vegetables such as broccoli and it is mixed with other substances, making GBS difficult to extract and purify for patients' use in clinical trials.

Woad might provide scientists with the first cheap, rich source of the compound, the research suggests.

Woad was used by tribes living in ancient Britain to colour their faces and bodies. Among them were the Iceni, led by Queen Boudicca, who went into battle against the Romans naked but painted blue.

The plant dye was highly prized in the Middle Ages but was largely replaced by cheaper, imported indigo in the 16th century.
Source

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 9:45 pm
by Linnea
Those are extraordinary teeth, they're perfectly aligned and super white. I wouldn't have guessed teeth like that were possible without orthodontia.

Re: remains found of gladiators in Roman Britain

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 10:10 pm
by Librtyhead
I am so glad I did not live back then...........I would have been a sheep herder or smoething. :P