favorite books?

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favorite books?

Postby silverpop » Sun Mar 21, 2010 2:42 am

well besides me does anyone else have a favorite book or books?

my favorite book is Juana spanish girl in central texas signed by Pearl andrus the lady who wrote the book, she gave the signed book to my father as a gift and when he died the book came to me
expect the unexpected

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Re: favorite books?

Postby Librtyhead » Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:15 pm

Is this it?
JUANA JOSEFINA CAVASOS BARNARD (1822-1906)
From the Texas Handbook Online



. Juana Cavasos Barnard, Indian captive, slaveowner, and pioneer in the area of present Somervell County, was born in Mexico to María Josefina Cavasos and was reportedly of Spanish and Italian lineage and a descendent of the Canary Islanders.qv Her family lived in Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Her grandfather, Narciso Cavasos, had received the largest Spanish land grant in Texas. In 1848 she married Charles E. Barnardqv of Connecticut, considered the first permanent non-Indian settler in the area of present Somervell County. They had fourteen children, six of whom survived into adulthood. She had twenty-five grandchildren and thirteen great grandchildren.
On August 15, 1844, Comanche Indians raided South Texas near the Rio Grande and captured Juana, who was then eighteen. One account reports that she was held captive for seven months, while another reports three years, but Juana's own testimony suggests she may have been captive less than a month. The Comanches visited the Tehuacana Creek Trading House operated by George Barnardqv in north central Texas. Barnard traded $300 in horses and merchandise for Juana. Shortly afterwards she married George's brother Charles. Charles Barnard has been recognized as having cordial relations with various Indian tribes. Juana noted that she lived in the Somervell County area for many months without seeing a white woman.

The Barnards accumulated some wealth through landholdings, trade, and income from a gristmill. In 1849 Charles and George established a trading post to trade with Indians. Juana may have helped operate the trading post, since she stated that they kept their trading house for the Indians for fifteen or twenty years. Charles bought out George's share in 1859. That year the United States government moved the Indians from the Fort Belknap reservation to Oklahoma, and thus the Barnards' customers decreased.

Using slave labor Barnard had a mill built in 1859-60, the first building at the site of present Glen Rose. Around 1860 he was considered an extensive slave owner. Juana apparently had one or several slaves in her household, since she noted they had "plenty of Negro slaves." In 1860 their real estate was valued at $50,000 and their personal estate at $60,400. In the early 1870s Charles sold the mill for $65,000. Charles and Juana's wealth declined in the 1890s. In their last years they resided in a small log house. When Charles died in 1900, Juana sold 200 acres to her children, but the bill of sale was not to take effect until her death, probably because she would have been homeless otherwise.

Juana and Charles were considered social leaders. Juana acted as a midwife and had some skill with medicinal herbs. She was reportedly an excellent horsewoman, and at the ripe age of seventy-eight she still maintained a garden. She was one of the few Spanish-Mexican women known to be an Indian captive, and she gave oral testimony to her granddaughter Verdie Barnard Alison in 1900, entitled "My Life with the Indians." In it she discussed the day of her capture and described the violent deaths she witnessed. She noted that she was captured for purposes of trade. Juana is the subject of Juana, A Spanish Girl in Central Texas by Pearl Andrus, a fictional account based on interviews with descendants and research. Juana Cavasos Barnard died of natural causes on February 1, 1906.
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Re: favorite books?

Postby silverpop » Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:36 pm

yes that is the girl that the book is about
expect the unexpected

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Re: favorite books?

Postby Millennium » Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:50 pm

Right now I'm reading "The Boys of Pointe Du Hoc" by Douglas Brinkley. It's about US Army Rangers and D-Day.
and my latest is "Liberty and Tyranny" from Mark Levin....He sent it to me personally, autographed and all.
Save America, IMPEACH OBAMA! And continue tossing out the deadbeat Democrats that are currently in office.
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Re: favorite books?

Postby Brian » Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:44 pm

The Catcher in the Rye

I'm also a fan of The Fountainhead
"I guess the winter makes you laugh a little slower
Makes you talk a little lower
About the things you could not show her."

-- Counting Crows, "A Long December"
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Re: favorite books?

Postby Librtyhead » Sun Mar 21, 2010 10:14 pm

[quote="Brian"]The Catcher in the Rye

:thumbleft: Fun book!

" I just broke a nail, getting out of a cab" she said. She looked up at me and sort of smiled.
She had a terrifically nice smile. She really did. most people have hardly any smile at all, or a lousy one. "Ernest's father and I sometimes worry about him," she said. "we sometimes feel that he is not a terribly good mixer."
"How do you mean?"
"Well. he's a very sensitive boy. He's really never been a terribly good mixer with other boys. Perhaps he takes things a little more seriously than he should at his age."
Sensitive. That killed me. That guy Morrow was about as sensitive as a goddamn toilet seat.

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Re: favorite books?

Postby ademrock » Tue Jul 19, 2011 4:56 am

My favorite books are Anna Karenina, Madame Bovary, War and Peace, Lolita, he Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Hamlet and The Great Gatsby.
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Re: favorite books?

Postby MADNOTBAD » Thu Jul 21, 2011 12:18 pm

http://white-history.com/

Authur, Historian, Arthur Kemp :heart: :heart: :heart: :heart:
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Re: favorite books?

Postby Saint » Thu Jul 21, 2011 3:58 pm

Favorite book? MINE!!!
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Re: favorite books?

Postby Saint » Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:04 pm

LOL. I probably just busted about ten board rules right there. But oh well! Seriously try these books:

"Papillon" by Henri Charierre (It's fantastically more complex and better than the movie.)
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"This Perfect Day" by Ira Levin - The Day of the Dolpin guy writes the best computer-run brave new world book ever.
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"Earth Abides" by Stewart - This is the end all, be all of end of the world disaster books. Makes "The Stand" seem like pretentious Sesame Street babble.
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